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Personal protective equipment

Personal protective equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_protective_equipment

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Safety equipment and supervisor instructions at a construction site

Personal protective equipment (PPE) refers to protective clothing, helmets, goggles, or other garments or equipment designed to protect the wearer's body from injury or infection. The hazards addressed by protective equipment include physical, electrical, heat, chemicals, biohazards, and airborne particulate matter. Protective equipment may be worn for job-related occupational safety and health purposes, as well as for sports and other recreational activities. "Protective clothing" is applied to traditional categories of clothing, and "protective gear" applies to items such as pads, guards, shields, or masks, and others.

The purpose of personal protective equipment is to reduce employee exposure to hazards when engineering controls and administrative controls are not feasible or effective to reduce these risks to acceptable levels. PPE is needed when there are hazards present. PPE has the serious limitation that it does not eliminate the hazard at the source and may result in employees being exposed to the hazard if the equipment fails.[1]

Any item of PPE imposes a barrier between the wearer/user and the working environment. This can create additional strains on the wearer; impair their ability to carry out their work and create significant levels of discomfort. Any of these can discourage wearers from using PPE correctly, therefore placing them at risk of injury, ill-health or, under extreme circumstances, death. Good ergonomic design can help to minimise these barriers and can therefore help to ensure safe and healthy working conditions through the correct use of PPE.

Practices of occupational safety and health can use hazard controls and interventions to mitigate workplace hazards, which pose a threat to the safety and quality of life of workers. The hierarchy of hazard controls provides a policy framework which ranks the types of hazard controls in terms of absolute risk reduction. At the top of the hierarchy are elimination and substitution, which remove the hazard entirely or replace the hazard with a safer alternative. If elimination or substitution measures cannot apply, engineering controls and administrative controls, which seek to design safer mechanisms and coach safer human behavior, are implemented. Personal protective equipment ranks last on the hierarchy of controls, as the workers are regularly exposed to the hazard, with a barrier of protection. The hierarchy of controls is important in acknowledging that, while personal protective equipment has tremendous utility, it is not the desired mechanism of control in terms of worker safety.

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Personal Protective Equipment

What is personal protective equipment?
Personal protective equipment, or PPE, is designed to protect employees from serious workplace injuries or illnesses resulting from contact with chemical, radiological, physical, electrical, mechanical, or other workplace hazards. Besides face shields, safety glasses, hard hats, and safety shoes, PPE includes a variety of devices and garments such as goggles, coveralls, gloves, vests, earplugs, and
respirators.

What are your responsibilities as an employer?
OSHA’s primary PPE standards are in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations ( CFR), Part 1910 Subpart I, and equivalent regulations in states with OSHA-approved state plans, but you can find PPE requirements elsewhere in the General Industry Standards. For example, 29 CFR 1910.156, OSHA’s Fire Brigades Standard, has requirements for firefighting gear. In addition, 29 CFR 1926.95-106 covers the construction industry. OSHA’s general PPE requirements mandate that employers conduct a hazard assessment of their workplaces to determine what hazards are present that require the use of PPE, provide workers with appropriate PPE, and require them to use and maintain it in sanitary and reliable condition. Using PPE is often essential, but it is generally the last line of defense after engineering controls, work practices, and administrative controls. Engineering controls involve physically changing a machine or work environment. Administrative controls involve changing how or when employees do their jobs, such as scheduling work and rotating employees to reduce exposures. Work practices involve training workers how to perform tasks in ways that reduce their exposure to workplace hazards.

As an employer, you must assess your workplace to determine if hazards are present that require the use of PPE. If such hazards are present, you must select PPE and require employees to use it, communicate your PPE selection decisions to your employees, and select PPE that properly fits your workers. You must also train employees who are required to wear PPE on how do the following:

  • Use PPE properly,
  • Be aware of when PPE is necessary,
  • Know what kind of PPE is necessary,
  • Understand the limitations of PPE in protecting employees from injury,
  • Don, adjust, wear, and doff PPE, and
  • Maintain PPE properly.

Can PPE protect workers from head injuries?
Yes. Hard hats can protect your employees from head impact, penetration injuries, and electrical injuries such as those caused by falling or flying objects, fixed objects, or contact with electrical conductors. Also, OSHA regulations require employers to ensure that workers cover and protect long hair to prevent it from getting caught in machine parts such as belts and chains.

How can PPE protect workers from foot and leg injuries?
In addition to foot guards and safety shoes, leggings (e.g., leather, aluminized rayon, or other appropriate material) can help prevent injuries by protecting employees from hazards such as falling or rolling objects, sharp objects, wet and slippery surfaces, molten metals, hot surfaces, and electrical hazards. 

Does PPE help protect workers from eye and face injuries?
Yes. Besides spectacles and goggles, PPE such as special helmets or shields, spectacles with side shields, and faceshields can protect employees from the hazards of flying fragments, large chips, hot sparks, optical radiation, splashes from molten metals, as well as objects, particles, sand, dirt, mists, dusts, and glare.

U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration 2002 

This is one in a series of informational fact sheets highlighting OSHA programs, policies, or standards. It does not impose any new compliance requirements or carry the force of legal opinion. For compliance requirements of OSHA standards or regulations, refer to Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This information will be made available to sensory-impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 693-1999. See also OSHA’s website at www.osha.gov.

What can PPE do to protect workers from hearing loss?
Wearing earplugs or earmuffs can help prevent damage to hearing. Exposure to high noise levels can cause irreversible hearing loss or impairment as well as physical and psychological stress. Earplugs made from foam, waxed cotton, or fiberglass wool are self-forming and usually fit well. A professional should fit your employees individually for molded or preformed earplugs. Clean earplugs regularly, and replace those you cannot clean. 

Should workers wear PPE to help prevent hand injuries?
Yes. Workers exposed to harmful substances through skin absorption, severe cuts or lacerations, severe abrasions, chemical burns, thermal burns, and harmful temperature extremes will benefit from hand protection.

Why should workers wear PPE to protect the whole body?
In some cases workers must shield most or all of their bodies against hazards in the workplace, such as exposure to heat and radiation as well as hot metals, scalding liquids, body fluids, hazardous materials or waste, and other hazards. In addition to fire-retardant wool and fire retardant cotton, materials used in whole-body PPE include rubber, leather, synthetics, and plastic.

When should workers wear PPE for respiratory protection?
When engineering controls are not feasible, workers must use appropriate respirators to protect against adverse health effects caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors. Respirators generally cover the nose and mouth or the entire face or head and help prevent illness and injury. A proper fit is essential, however, for respirators to be effective. All employees required to wear respirators must first undergo medical evaluation.

How can I get more information?
You can find more information about PPE, including the full text of OSHA’s standards, on OSHA’s website at www.osha.gov. In addition, publications explaining the subject of PPE in greater detail are available from OSHA. Personal Protective Equipment (OSHA 3077) and Assessing the Need for Personal Protective Equipment: A Guide for Small Business Employers (OSHA 3151) are available on OSHA’s website. For more information about personal protective equipment in the construction industry, visit http://www.osha-slc.gov/SLTC/constructionppe/index.html. To file a complaint by phone, report an emergency, or get OSHA advice, assistance, or products, contact your nearest OSHA office under the “U.S. Department of Labor” listing in your phone book, or call (800) 321-OSHA (6742); teletypewriter (TTY) number is (877) 889-5627. To file a complaint online or obtain more information on OSHA federal and state programs, visit OSHA’s website at www.osha.gov.

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Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
https://www.ppe.org/osha/

OSHA requires the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce employee exposure to hazards when engineering and administrative controls are not feasible or effective in reducing these exposures to acceptable levels. Employers are required to determine if PPE should be used to protect their workers.

Hazards exist in every workplace in many different forms: sharp edges, falling objects, flying sparks, chemicals, noise and a myriad of other potentially dangerous situations. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that employers protect their employees from workplace hazards that can cause injury.

Controlling a hazard at its source is the best way to protect employees. Depending on the hazard or workplace conditions, OSHA recommends the use of engineering or work practice controls to manage or eliminate hazards to the greatest extent possible. For example, building a barrier between the hazard and the employees is an engineering control; changing the way in which employees perform their work is a work practice control.

When engineering, work practice and administrative controls are not feasible or do not provide sufficient protection, employers must provide personal protective equipment (PPE) to their employees and ensure its use. Personal protective equipment, commonly referred to as “PPE”, is equipment worn to minimize exposure to a variety of hazards. Examples of PPE include such items as gloves, foot and eye protection, protective hearing devices (earplugs, muffs) hard hats, respirators and full body suits.

This guide will help both employers and employees do the following:

  • Understand the types of PPE.
  • Know the basics of conducting a “hazard assessment” of the workplace.
  • Select appropriate PPE for a variety of circumstances.
  • Understand what kind of training is needed in the proper use and care of PPE.

If PPE is to be used, a PPE program should be implemented. This program should address the hazards present; the selection, maintenance, and use of PPE; the training of employees; and monitoring of the program to ensure its ongoing effectiveness.

The Requirement for PPE

To ensure the greatest possible protection for employees in the workplace, the cooperative efforts of both employers and employees will help in establishing and maintaining a safe and healthful work environment.

In general, employers are responsible for:

  • Performing a “hazard assessment” of the workplace to identify and control physical and health hazards.
  • Identifying and providing appropriate PPE for employees.
  • Training employees in the use and care of the PPE.
  • Maintaining PPE, including replacing worn or damaged PPE.
  • Periodically reviewing, updating and evaluating the effectiveness of the PPE program.

In general, employees should:

  • Properly wear PPE,
  • Attend training sessions on PPE,
  • Care for, clean and maintain PPE, and
  • Inform a supervisor of the need to repair or replace PPE.

Specific requirements for PPE are presented in many different OSHA standards, published in 29 CFR. Some standards require that employers provide PPE at no cost to the employee while others simply state that the employer must provide PPE. Appendix A at page 40 lists those standards that require the employer to provide PPE and those that require the employer to provide PPE at no cost to the employee.

The Hazard Assessment

A first critical step in developing a comprehensive safety and health program is to identify physical and health hazards in the workplace. This process is known as a “hazard assessment.” Potential hazards may be physical or health-related and a comprehensive hazard assessment should identify hazards in both categories. Examples of physical hazards include moving objects, fluctuating temperatures, high intensity lighting, rolling or pinching objects, electrical connections and sharp edges. Examples of health hazards include overexposure to harmful dusts, chemicals or radiation.

The hazard assessment should begin with a walk-through survey of the facility to develop a list of potential hazards in the following basic hazard categories:

  • Impact,
  • Penetration,
  • Compression (roll-over),
  • Chemical,
  • Heat/cold,
  • Harmful dust,
  • Light (optical) radiation, and
  • Biologic.

In addition to noting the basic layout of the facility and reviewing any history of occupational illnesses or injuries, things to look for during the walk-through survey include:

  • Sources of electricity.
  • Sources of motion such as machines or processes where movement may exist that could result in an impact between personnel and equipment.
  • Sources of high temperatures that could result in burns, eye injuries or fire.
  • Types of chemicals used in the workplace.
  • Sources of harmful dusts.
  • Sources of light radiation, such as welding, brazing, cutting, furnaces, heat treating, high intensity lights, etc.
  • The potential for falling or dropping objects.
  • Sharp objects that could poke, cut, stab or puncture.
  • Biologic hazards such as blood or other potentially infected material.

When the walk-through is complete, the employer should organize and analyze the data so that it may be efficiently used in determining the proper types of PPE required at the worksite. The employer should become aware of the different types of PPE available and the levels of protection offered. It is definitely a good idea to select PPE that will provide a level of protection greater than the minimum required to protect employees from hazards.

The workplace should be periodically reassessed for any changes in conditions, equipment or operating procedures that could affect occupational hazards. This periodic reassessment should also include a review of injury and illness records to spot any trends or areas of concern and taking appropriate corrective action. The suitability of existing PPE, including an evaluation of its condition and age, should be included in the reassessment.

Documentation of the hazard assessment is required through a written certification that includes the following information:

  • Identification of the workplace evaluated;
  • Name of the person conducting the assessment;
  • Date of the assessment; and
  • Identification of the document certifying completion of the hazard assessment.

Selecting PPE

All PPE clothing and equipment should be of safe design and construction, and should be maintained in a clean and reliable fashion. Employers should take the fit and comfort of PPE into consideration when selecting appropriate items for their workplace. PPE that fits well and is comfortable to wear will encourage employee use of PPE. Most protective devices are available in multiple sizes and care should be taken to select the proper size for each employee. If several different types of PPE are worn together, make sure they are compatible. If PPE does not fit properly, it can make the difference between being safely covered or dangerously exposed. It may not provide the level of protection desired and may discourage employee use.

OSHA requires that many categories of PPE meet or be equivalent to standards developed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). ANSI has been preparing safety standards since the 1920s, when the first safety standard was approved to protect the heads and eyes of industrial workers. Employers who need to provide PPE in the categories listed below must make certain that any new equipment procured meets the cited ANSI standard. Existing PPE stocks must meet the ANSI standard in effect at the time of its manufacture or provide protection equivalent to PPE manufactured to the ANSI criteria. Employers should inform employees who provide their own PPE of the employer’s selection decisions and ensure that any employee-owned PPE used in the workplace conforms to the employer’s criteria, based on the hazard assessment, OSHA requirements and ANSI standards. OSHA requires PPE to meet the following ANSI standards:

  • Eye and Face Protection: ANSI Z87.1-1989 (USA Standard for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection).
  • Head Protection: ANSI Z89.1-1986.
  • Foot Protection: ANSI Z41.1-1991.

For hand protection, there is no ANSI standard for gloves but OSHA recommends that selection be based upon the tasks to be performed and the performance and construction characteristics of the glove material. For protection against chemicals, glove selection must be based on the chemicals encountered, the chemical resistance and the physical properties of the glove material.

Training Employees in the Proper Use of PPE

Employers are required to train each employee who must use PPE. Employees must be trained to know at least the following:

  • When PPE is necessary.
  • What PPE is necessary.
  • How to properly put on, take off, adjust and wear the PPE.
  • The limitations of the PPE.
  • Proper care, maintenance, useful life and disposal of PPE.

Employers should make sure that each employee demonstrates an understanding of the PPE training as well as the ability to properly wear and use PPE before they are allowed to perform work requiring the use of the PPE. If an employer believes that a previously trained employee is not demonstrating the proper understanding and skill level in the use of PPE, that employee should receive retraining. Other situations that require additional or retraining of employees include the following circumstances: changes in the workplace or in the type of required PPE that make prior training obsolete.

The employer must document the training of each employee required to wear or use PPE by preparing a certification containing the name of each employee trained, the date of training and a clear identification of the subject of the certification.

PPE is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, and longshoring.

OSHA can provide extensive help through a variety of programs, including technical assistance about effective safety and health programs, state plans, workplace consultations, voluntary protection programs, strategic partnerships, training and education, and more. An overall commitment to workplace safety and health can add value to your business, to your workplace and to your life.

Information on US standards for personal protection equipment (PPE) can be found on the OSHA PPE page.

U.S. Department of Labor

 

Find the right safety products for your workplace and people:

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Personal Protective Equipment

Personal Protective Equipment
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/emres/ppe.html

Personal protective equipment is very important for any emergency responder. There are five main types of PPE that are covered on this page: respirators and protective clothing (selection, proper use, etc.), skin exposures and eye and hearing protection.

Respirators

Respirator User Notice Issued November 27, 2013: Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) Testing for NIOSH CBRN Respirator Approvals

Guidance on Emergency Responder Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Response to CBRN Terrorism Incidents
This document provides comparison information on the OSHA/EPA Protection Levels A, B, and C to DHS adopted Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) performance based standards for response to terrorism incidents involving Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) hazards.

Protecting Emergency Responders, Volume 4: Personal Protective Equipment Guidelines for Structural Collapse Events
This guidance focuses on three issues that present unique challenges in the response to a multistory-building collapse: (1) protection from biological hazards; (2) protection from inhalation of hazardous materials; and (3) required modifications to responders' typical PPE ensembles because of the duration and intensity of the response. Other documents in this NIOSH/Rand series.

What You Should Know in Deciding Whether to Buy Escape Hoods, Gas Masks, or Other Respirators for Preparedness at Home and Work
Information for any employer or consumer considering purchasing escape hoods or other respirators to protect themselves against potential terrorist threats, including biological and chemical substances. This guidance provides information on what respirators are, how they work, and what is needed for a respirator to provide protection.

NIOSH Respirator Topic Page
This page provides information on basic respirator protection as well as types of respirators, user notices, respirator selection, respirator certification process, standards and rulemaking.

NIOSH Respirator Selection Logic 2004
DHHS (NIOSH) Pub. No. 2005-100
Provides a process that respirator program administrators can use to select appropriate respirators to protect workers in specific workplaces. Replaces the NIOSH Respirator Decision Logic (NIOSH Publication No. 87-108), and includes information on N-95 through P-100 particulate respirators.

Certified Equipment List
This searchable database contains all certified respirators. Users can search on type of respirator, protection, manufacturer, facepiece type, etc. to find out the equipment that has been approved by NIOSH that meet the search criteria.

OSHA / NIOSH Personal Protective Equipment Selection Matrix for Emergency Responders
Identifies areas where chemical contamination is likely or less likely using a zone matrix (red, yellow, and green). Also lists specific risks and guidance on selecting PPE in each zone.

OSHA/NIOSH Interim Guidance: CBRN Personal Protective Equipment Selection Matrix for Emergency Responders - Radiological Dispersal Device
Provides technical assistance to employers in an emergency response event related to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD), or "Dirty Bomb".

OSHA/NIOSH Interim Guidance - CBRN Personal Protective Equipment Selection Matrix for Emergency Responders- Nerve Agents
Provides technical assistance to employers in an emergency response event related to exposure to nerve agents.

OSHA/NIOSH Interim Guidance - CBRN Personal Protective Equipment Selection Matrix for Emergency Responders - Blister Agents
Provides technical assistance to employers in an emergency response event related to exposure to blister agents

Suggested Respirator Cleaning and Sanitation Procedures
Guidance for selecting cleaning equipment and supplies, procedures for respirator maintenance.

Protective Clothing

NIOSH Protective Clothing Topic Page
Provides guidance on selection of chemical protective clothing and other information resources from NIOSH's Protective Clothing and Ensembles program. This program incorporates a broad range of studies of how chemicals seep through barrier materials, leak through small holes, or change the barrier material to reduce its protection.

Recommendations for the Selection and Use of Respirators and Protective Clothing for Protection Against Biological Agents
NIOSH Publication Number 2009-132
This document is based on current understanding of the potential agents and existing recommendations for biological aerosols and is oriented toward acts of terrorism.

NIOSH Interim Guidance on Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing for Flood Response Workers
Provides information on hazards to flood cleanup workers and guidance for selecting clothing and protective equipment.
En Español

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Exposure limits, Respirator Recommendations, First Aid, more... The Pocket Guide is a source of general industrial hygiene information on several hundred chemicals/classes found in the work environment. Key data provided for each chemical/substance includes name (including synonyms/trade names), structure/formula, CAS/RTECS Numbers, DOT ID, conversion factors, exposure limits, IDLH, chemical and physical properties, measurement methods, personal protection, respirator recommendations, symptoms, and first aid.

Skin Exposures

NIOSH Skin Exposures and Effects Topic Page
Information related to NIOSH skin research as well as a link to the NIOSH skin permeation calculator, a resource that allows users to input data and measure the conductance of skin to a particular chemical from a particular vehicle.

Eye Protection

NIOSH Eye Safety Topic Page
Contains general information on preventing eye injuries as well as NIOSH eye safety resources, occupational eye injury statistics, and eye related NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluations and Fatality Reports

Eye Safety - Emergency Response & Disaster Recovery
This NIOSH web page provides an overview of eye hazards and injuries, types of eye protection, safety for prescription lens wearers, first aid, etc.
En Español

Eye Protection for Infection Control
This NIOSH web page provides background information and specific details on eye protection that can be used to supplement eye protection recommendations provided in current CDC infection control guidance documents. It is intended to familiarize workers with the various types of eye protection available, their characteristics, and their applicable use.

Hearing Protection

NIOSH Noise and Hearing Loss Protection Topic Page
Page provides information on choosing a hearing aid that is right for you, access to the NIOSH Noise Meter, hearing conservation check list and toolbox (for hearing conservation professionals)

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Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Occupational Safety and Health Administration
https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=9777

 

• Part Number: 1910
• Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards
• Subpart: I
• Subpart Title: Personal Protective Equipment
• Standard Number: 1910.132
• Title: General requirements.
• GPO Source: e-CFR


1910.132(a)

Application. Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment for eyes, face, head, and extremities, protective clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers, shall be provided, used, and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition wherever it is necessary by reason of hazards of processes or environment, chemical hazards, radiological hazards, or mechanical irritants encountered in a manner capable of causing injury or impairment in the function of any part of the body through absorption, inhalation or physical contact.

1910.132(b)

Employee-owned equipment. Where employees provide their own protective equipment, the employer shall be responsible to assure its adequacy, including proper maintenance, and sanitation of such equipment.

1910.132(c)

Design. All personal protective equipment shall be of safe design and construction for the work to be performed.

1910.132(d)

Hazard assessment and equipment selection.

1910.132(d)(1)

The employer shall assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, which necessitate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). If such hazards are present, or likely to be present, the employer shall:

1910.132(d)(1)(i)

Select, and have each affected employee use, the types of PPE that will protect the affected employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment;

1910.132(d)(1)(ii)

Communicate selection decisions to each affected employee; and,

1910.132(d)(1)(iii)

Select PPE that properly fits each affected employee.

Note: Non-mandatory appendix B contains an example of procedures that would comply with the requirement for a hazard assessment.

1910.132(d)(2)

The employer shall verify that the required workplace hazard assessment has been performed through a written certification that identifies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the date(s) of the hazard assessment; and, which identifies the document as a certification of hazard assessment.

1910.132(e)

Defective and damaged equipment. Defective or damaged personal protective equipment shall not be used.

1910.132(f)

Training.

1910.132(f)(1)

The employer shall provide training to each employee who is required by this section to use PPE. Each such employee shall be trained to know at least the following:

1910.132(f)(1)(i)

When PPE is necessary;

1910.132(f)(1)(ii)

What PPE is necessary;

1910.132(f)(1)(iii)

How to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear PPE;

1910.132(f)(1)(iv)

The limitations of the PPE; and,

1910.132(f)(1)(v)

The proper care, maintenance, useful life and disposal of the PPE.

1910.132(f)(2)

Each affected employee shall demonstrate an understanding of the training specified in paragraph (f)(1) of this section, and the ability to use PPE properly, before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE.

1910.132(f)(3)

When the employer has reason to believe that any affected employee who has already been trained does not have the understanding and skill required by paragraph (f)(2) of this section, the employer shall retrain each such employee. Circumstances where retraining is required include, but are not limited to, situations where:

1910.132(f)(3)(i)

Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete; or

1910.132(f)(3)(ii)

Changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete; or

1910.132(f)(3)(iii)

Inadequacies in an affected employee's knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding or skill.

1910.132(g)

Paragraphs (d) and (f) of this section apply only to §§ 1910.133, 1910.135, 1910.136, 1910.138, and 1910.140. Paragraphs (d) and (f) of this section do not apply to §§ 1910.134 and 1910.137.

1910.132(h)

Payment for protective equipment.

1910.132(h)(1)

Except as provided by paragraphs (h)(2) through (h)(6) of this section, the protective equipment, including personal protective equipment (PPE), used to comply with this part, shall be provided by the employer at no cost to employees.

1910.132(h)(2)

The employer is not required to pay for non-specialty safety-toe protective footwear (including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and non-specialty prescription safety eyewear, provided that the employer permits such items to be worn off the job-site.

1910.132(h)(3)

When the employer provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots.

1910.132(h)(4)

The employer is not required to pay for:

1910.132(h)(4)(i)

The logging boots required by 29 CFR 1910.266(d)(1)(v);

1910.132(h)(4)(ii)

Everyday clothing, such as long-sleeve shirts, long pants, street shoes, and normal work boots; or

1910.132(h)(4)(iii)

Ordinary clothing, skin creams, or other items, used solely for protection from weather, such as winter coats, jackets, gloves, parkas, rubber boots, hats, raincoats, ordinary sunglasses, and sunscreen.

1910.132(h)(5)

The employer must pay for replacement PPE, except when the employee has lost or intentionally damaged the PPE.

1910.132(h)(6)

Where an employee provides adequate protective equipment he or she owns pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, the employer may allow the employee to use it and is not required to reimburse the employee for that equipment. The employer shall not require an employee to provide or pay for his or her own PPE, unless the PPE is excepted by paragraphs (h)(2) through (h)(5) of this section.

1910.132(h)(7)

This paragraph (h) shall become effective on February 13, 2008. Employers must implement the PPE payment requirements no later than May 15, 2008.

Note to §1910.132(h): When the provisions of another OSHA standard specify whether or not the employer must pay for specific equipment, the payment provisions of that standard shall prevail.

[39 FR 23502, June 27, 1974, as amended at 59 FR 16334, April 6, 1994; 59 FR 33910, July 1, 1994; 59 FR 34580, July 6, 1994; 72 FR 64428, Nov. 15, 2007; 76 FR 33606, June 8, 2011; 81 FR 82999, Nov. 18, 2016]

Next Standard (1910.133)

Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents

 

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